Virtual Presentations 2021

Natasha Lorca Yannacanedo

Natasha Lorca Yannacanedo

Assistant Professor, Humanities, VPA

Title: Accessing Emotion: An Exploration of Alba Emoting and Alba Technique
Abstract: Alba Emoting is a system of working with emotions and developing emotional intelligence. Some theatre professionals erroneously assume this technique is about “playing the emotion” because of the use of the word “emoting.” However, by using the emotional effector patterns, the specific patterns of breath, postural attitude, and facial muscle tension applied in Alba Emoting, it actually empowers the actor to have full access and clear expressiveness of their emotions. In addition, actors can avoid the emotional “hangover” many experience with emotionally challenging roles. This article chronicles my experiences with Alba Emoting and Alba Technique, provides some background on its evolution, and discusses its potential benefits.
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Linda Miles

Linda Miles

Assistant Professor, Hostos Library

Title: Community College Librarians’ Research Practices: Preliminary Results
Abstract: As members of the Scholarly Research Committee of a national professional organization, we are taking on a research project to learn more about the research and publication practices of community college librarians, a subject that is underrepresented in the professional literature of our discipline. Using survey and focus group research, we will learn how much and what kinds of research community college librarians take on, and how much and where they publish. Most crucially, data about barriers to this type of activity will position the Scholarly Research Committee well to support new research and professional development for community college librarian researchers.
Link to Video-Presentation

Vyacheslav Dushenkov

Vyacheslav Dushenkov

Associate Professor, Natural Sciences

Title: Phytochemical adaptation of invasive alien species from the US to South Africa conditions
Abstract: Globalization facilitated the spread of invasive alien species (IAS), undermining the stability of the world’s ecosystems. We investigated the metabolomic profiles of three IAS species: Chromolaena odorata (Asteraceae), Datura stramonium (Solanaceae), and Xanthium strumarium (Asteraceae), comparing metabolites of individual plants in their native habitats (USA), to their invasive counterparts growing in and around Kruger National Park (ZA). Invasive populations of all species were more phytochemically diverse than their native counterparts, and their metabolomic profiles were statistically distinguishable from their native relatives. These data may elucidate the mechanisms of successful invasion and rapid adaptive evolution of IAS.
Link to Poster

Zvi Ostrin

Zvi Ostrin

Associate Professor, Natural Sciences

Title: Student engagement and active learning in the digital world
Abstract: We assessed the pedagogical value of mobile devices and content-specific application software in the laboratory component of Anatomy and Physiology 1. In the “experimental” lab sessions students used only mobile devices along with histology and anatomy apps, whereas in the more traditional “control” lab sessions students used light microscopes and glass slides. Overall the experimental student cohort felt that the digital technology motivated them to learn the subject matter, and they considered the apps to be more effective as a learning tool than the traditional lab approach. We are currently introducing virtual microscopy in the A&P lab.
Link to Poster

Yoel Rodríguez

Yoel Rodríguez

Professor, Natural Sciences

Title: Leveraging Financial Support, Faculty and Peer Mentoring to Improve Engineering Education
Abstract: Aligned with the nationwide effort to increase the number, caliber, and diversity of the STEM workforce, we have created the NSF-funded Hostos Engineering Academic Talent (HEAT) Scholarship Program which offers its scholars financial support, and wealth of high-impact activities that have been shown to improve their likelihood of success. We will share the HEAT model, and our understanding of the impact of a combined faculty and peer mentorship approach. We expect the program and its findings to be generalizable to other populations, and thus be an opportunity to other STEM programs at a variety of institutions whose students could benefit.
Link to Poster 1: Leveraging Financial Supp…
Link to Poster 2: Structure-Based Virtual …
Link to Poster 3: Structure-Based Charact…

Bronislaw Czarnocha (Dr.C)

Bronislaw Czarnocha (Dr.C)

Professor, Mathematics

Title: Creativity of Aha! Moment in our classrooms
Abstract: The presentation is devoted to the creativity of our students in Mathematics, and more generally, students of STEM. The creativity of Aha! Moment is a new approach to creativity formulated to describe and expressed creativity of rank and file students of Hostos and other centers of urban education in the upcoming book by Czarnocha and Baker (April 2021). The book describes methods of Aha! Moment facilitation, measurement of the depth (or height) of knowledge (DoK) reached during Aha! Insight and connects classroom bisociative creativity with the domain of computer creativity, principles of AI and neuroscience.

William A. Casari

William A. Casari

Associate Professor, Library and Archives

Title: The First Decade: A Visual History of Hostos
Abstract: Magda J. Vasillov, a photographer, art historian and professor at Hostos, took hundreds of black-and-white photographs documenting the first years of the college beginning with the first day of classes in 1970. This presentation will showcase a selection of those photographs and explain the research undertaken to analyze and select photographs for the eventual creation of a photography book documenting Hostos’ first decade. Initial research on this archival collection was undertaken as part of a Title V project. The events, topics and subjects represented present a counter narrative to the troubled history of the South Bronx during this period. These images demonstrate the positive forces that formed in direct resistance to the urban blight that surrounded Hostos.
Link to Video-Presentation

Olga Steinberg

Olga Steinberg

Professor, Natural Sciences

Title: Molecular mechanism of Trf2 – telomeric DNA interaction in Ustilago maydis
Abstract: Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes located at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes. Regulation of telomere maintenance by the telomere-associated proteins is important for genome stability, and its disruption may lead to premature ageing and cancer. UmTrf2 is a protein discovered in a fungus Ustilago maydis. Based on genome sequence analysis of the UmTrf2, its similarity to the telomere-binding protein HsTrf1, the presence of DNA-binding Myb and protein-protein interaction TRFH domains, UmTrf2 is presumed to be a telomere-associated protein. Both the Myb and the TRFH domains in UmTrh2 have a number of insertions not found in other telomere-binding proteins.
The goal of this research project was to investigate specificity of the UmTrf2 – telomere DNA binding: whether dimerization is required for UmTrf2-DNA interaction, and whether domains insertions affect this interaction. If UmTrf2 is a Ustilago telomere binding protein, then its binding to telomeres should be specific and require homo-dimerization. […]
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Evelyn Fernandez-Ketcham

Evelyn Fernandez-Ketcham

HEO, CEWD

Title: Hostos NYC Department of Youth and Community Development Train and Earn Program
Abstract: Hostos Train and Earn Career Pathways Program provides comprehensive supports, career and transition to employment and/or college services to 18 to 24 years old while completing an occupational training course. Rooted on a psycho-educational model focused on transition planning, the program includes an Intro to Careers in Healthcare and IT Seminars. This vestibule, acts as a bridge to the occupational training courses/programs available to students in the Division of Continuing Education and Workforce Development (CEWD) and that articulate to college credits if enrolled at Hostos. A “Theory and an Alliance,” Bridging Multiple Worlds Theory (Cooper, Dominguez, Cooper, Jr., Higgins and Lipka, 2018) is a framework that informs the Hostos Train and Earn Career Pathways Program model, creating a pathway for underrepresented college goers. […]
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Víctor M. Torres-Vélez

Víctor M. Torres-Vélez

Assistant Professor, Humanties, LAC Unit

Title: Dolor y rabia: The passionate politics of women’s activism in Vieques, Puerto Rico.
Abstract: On March 28, 2021 the last proof read for this essay was submitted and accepted for publication in the Latino Studies Journal’s next issue.
Based on ethnography conducted during the height of anti-military struggle in Vieques, Puerto Rico, in the early 2000s, this article examines Viequense women’s intense forms of suffering and correspondingly powerful forms of collective action. It explores how the affective dimensions of Vieques women’s dolor (suffering) and rabia (indignation) became catalysts for their politicization. The article posits that the gendered and intersubjective experience of confronting illness in a physical landscape devasted by military pollution can impel women to pose new questions and ideas regarding disease etiology. At the intersections of political ecology, medical anthropology, and environmental justice, this article concludes that in confronting the ubiquity of dolor y rabia, Viequense women found the strength to fight back against the most powerful military in the world.
Link to Excerpt

Elizabeth Porter

Elizabeth Porter

Assistant Professor, English

Title: Clarissa’s Commerce: Relocations and Relationships in London
Abstract: This article was published in the peer-reviewed journal Eighteenth-Century Fiction in the Spring 2021 issue. In this article, I analyze Samuel Richardson’s 1747-48 novel Clarissa (the longest novel written in the English language). While the tragic title character suffers immensely in the course of the novel, I argue that we see Clarissa exert agency in her navigation of London. In the Covent Garden neighborhood of London, she is able to financially support herself and live as a single woman for the period before her untimely death. Richardson, I contend, presents a complex view of the developing London metropolis and–at least temporarily– imagines plots for women outside of a circuit of sexual exchange.

Emmanuel A. Velayos Larrabure

Emmanuel A. Velayos Larrabure

Assistant Professor, Humanities, LAC Unit

Title: Drawing Words and Gestures: A Theory of Language from Early Republican Spanish America
Abstract: I study the embodied rendition of written speech in the work of the Venezuelan Simón Rodríguez, Bolívar’s mentor and a key figure in early republican Spanish America. Western enlightened thinkers explored the oral origins of language and proposed reforms for writing to accommodate pronunciation. However, for Rodríguez, the audible dimension of language was not its ultimate reality but the result of bodily movements. In facial and corporal gestures, he found the foundation of oral speech and writing. I examine how Rodríguez refashioning of enlightened debates on orality and developed his performative take on the origins of language.
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Aaron Botwick

Aaron Botwick

Assistant Professor, English

Title: Common Graves: The “Sensational Suicide Story” of Victorian Print Media
Abstract: In Victorian England, a profusion of texts offered their readers easily-digestible suicides framed by legal, religious, journalistic, medical, and literary discourses that combined a desire to understand and excuse voluntary death with still-rudimentary Enlightenment tools. These interlocutors foster a culture of communal creation of suicide narratives that shrouds the victims, in effect silencing their voices by speaking on their behalf. In addition to broadsheets, religious tracts, legal commentary, and Acts of Parliament, I read works by Thomas Hood, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy to argue that much of the culture coalesced to facilitate such an understanding of suicide.

Tram Nguyen

Tram Nguyen

Assistant Professor, English

Title: “Gertrude Stein and French Nationalism”
Abstract: This project argues that Stein’s Jewishness was forgiven because of her assimilation into French society as well as her class status. The French Vichy government of WWII established convenient distinctions between French and foreign Jews, believing it necessary to sacrifice foreign Jews to “protect” its citizens. This would be shown to be a fabrication. For me, this political delineation demonstrates a form of French nationalism that is profoundly chaotic, xenophobic, and to Stein’s advantage.

Gregory Marks

Gregory Marks

Professor, English

Title: Nathan Wright: Ministering Black Power
Abstract: Nathan Wright (1923-2005) was an ordained Episcopal minister, a WW2 veteran, Harvard grad, and life-long Republican who worked in the Nixon and Reagan administrations. Yet this seemingly conservative figure participated in bus rides in the segregated south, chaired the “National Conference on Black Power” in 1967, and wrote books with titles such as Black Power and Urban Unrest, and Ready to Riot, and later became the founding Chair of SUNY-Albany’s African and African-American Studies Department. My project will try to put these two seemingly contradictory sides of this largely forgotten Black thinker in conversation with each other.